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Content about Cartography

June 27, 2013

The U.S. OpenStreetMap community gathered in San Francisco over the weekend for its annual conference, the State of the Map. The loose citizen-cartography collective has now been incrementally mapping the world since 2004. While they were taking stock, it turns out the global open mapping effort has now mapped data on more than 78 million buildings and 21 million miles of road (if you wanted to drive all those roads at, say, 60 miles an hour, it would take you some 40 years to do it).

From http://www.theatlanticcities.com.  By Emily Badger

June 21, 2013

Urban/regional planner? Interested in open source geospatial tools? Here's a short round up of some. 

From http://scenarioplanningtools.org.  By Jason Lally, @synchronouscity:
May 31, 2013

The rise of powerful consumer-focused mapping tools is shifting the centre of gravity in the once-rarefied spatial information market. But at what cost, convenience?

July 18, 2012

How can technology provide useful insights in how cities function? How can this contribute to more informed planning? How does this impact society? The multidisciplinary conference, City of Flows, last week in Potsdam, Germany, explored these questions last week, providing unique“perspectives on the digital city in analog spaces”. I was fortunate to attend the conference and came away with many reflections concerning mapping and visualization of geographical data and the effects this technology has on society. 

How can technology provide useful insights in how cities function? How can this contribute to more informed planning? How does this impact society? The multidisciplinary conference, City of Flows, last week in Potsdam, Germany, explored these questions last week, providing unique“perspectives on the digital city in analog spaces”. I was fortunate to attend the conference and came away with many reflections concerning mapping and visualization of geographical data and the effects this technology has on society.

April 19, 2012

A couple of weeks ago, I was able to attend the 2012 Where Conference, held in San Fransisco, California, and I am pleased to say that this year’s event surpassed all of my expectations. For those of you not familiar with this conference, the annual event features the latest and greatest in location-based social applications, mapping technology, and innovative GIS related public engagement best practices. While many of the presentations at this year’s Where Conference focused on leveraging location-based social media apps installed on our smart phones and tablets, it was the presentations about creating compelling stories about place and space that caught my attention as they relate specifically to public involvement, which can provide planners with some very useful resources in citizen engagement. Overall, I would say that “doing GIS” is getting easier.

March 15, 2012

A major new trend in cartography and urban planning, Web Mapping can safely be regarded as one of the hottest new public engagement tools. Historically, cartography was expensive, restrictive, and complex. However, with the relatively recent rise of web mapping, a range of free and proprietary data and technology has been born. As a result, the barrier to entry for creating maps on the web has shifted from that of the paper atlas and other traditional cartography.

A major new trend in cartography and urban planning, Web Mapping can safely be regarded as one of the hottest new public engagement tools. Historically, cartography was expensive, restrictive, and complex. However, with the relatively recent rise of web mapping, a range of free and proprietary data and technology has been born. As a result, the barrier to entry for creating maps on the web has shifted from that of the paper atlas and other traditional cartography.

March 1, 2012

There is so much that can be accomplished today with one of the most fundamental tools for communities: the map. Data-driven storytelling with online maps provides a concrete and easily digestible tool to engage citizens in a manner they are familiar with. But what stories should your map tell? Which data should power it and which segment of the population will find value in your map?

There is so much that can be accomplished today with one of the most fundamental tools for communities: the map. Data-driven storytelling with online maps provides a concrete and easily digestible tool to engage citizens in a manner they are familiar with. But what stories should your map tell? Which data should power it and which segment of the population will find value in your map?

February 8, 2012

We see them every day, popping up on our Twitter feeds, filtered through blogs, or even scattered throughout the New York Times: maps portraying not the usual locations or destinations, but data. From people’s kisses in Toronto, to the concentration of pizza joints in New York, to the number of women who ride bikes, to the likelihood of being killed by a car in any given American city, the list of lenses through which we can now view our cities and neighborhoods goes on, thanks to data-mapping geeks.



Editor's Note: Christine McLaren is the resident blogger for the BMW Guggenheim Lab, a mobile think tank investigating solutions to urban problems. In October the project wrapped up its three-month run in New York City, and will travel next to Berlin, and on to Mumbai. This story, titled New cartographers: How citizen mapmakers are changing the story of our lives originally appeared on the Lab's blog.

October 18, 2010

It looks like MapQuest is following in Microsoft’s footsteps…they will incorporate data from OpenStreetMap into a “beta launch of four new European mapping sites”. Visitors to the sites will be able to update the data on the sites using a MapQuest UI.

It looks like MapQuest is following in Microsoft’s footsteps…they will incorporate data from OpenStreetMap into a “beta launch of four new European mapping sites”. Visitors to the sites will be able to update the data on the sites using a MapQuest UI.